Posted by: 82ojos | May 11, 2009

Hummingbird Lights and Cancer Collage

Cancer Is Not Just A Sign by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

I have been trying to quit smoking lately and have been unsuccessful thus far.  So, this is my expression of the frustration to quit one of the most addictive substances on the planet.  I invested quite a bit of time and used quite a few images only to be dissatisfied and in need of a cigarette…

Hummingbird Lights

Hummingbird Lights by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

So, I made another piece, this time using only a few images and a simplistic idea.  This piece is a testament that sometimes less is more, ideas are key and the expression of frustration will sometimes result in further frustration.

Posted by: 82ojos | May 11, 2009

Ralph Bakshi

Ralph Bakshi

bakshi2-brighter

The celebrated artist, Ralph Bakshi is famous for his mature animation with principals that align with political interpretation and irony.  Even though he was born in October, 1938 in Haifa, Israel, his family soon immigrated to New York in 1939 to escape World War II (www.animationarchive.org/bio/2005/12/bakshi-ralph).  In Brooklyn, he attended the former High School of Industrial Arts which is now the High School of Art and Design.  Bakshi displayed giftedness in the arts from a young age in elementary school.  Therefore, it came as no surprise, when Bakshi graduated in 1957 when he began his journey in cartooning at the age of eighteen.  Terrytoons animation studio in New Rochelle hired him as a cell polisher, and eventually he was promoted to cell painting (www.tv.com/ralph-bakshi/person/45086/summary.html).
Freshly acquired by the CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System) productions network, Terrytoons experienced an age of reformation and reorganization, so it was a perfect opportunity for a young, creative man to fabricate an impact.  Since Bakshi was industrious and worked nights and weekends, he rapidly changed positions to an inker.  With his new title, he staked claim of a vacant desk in the animator’s department then asserted that he was now promoted to an animator (www.ralphbakshi.com).  Next, he requested to animate scenes for shows such as “Mighty Mouse,” “Heckle & Jeckle,” “Deputy Dawg,” “Foofle,” and “Lariat Sam.” Additionally, at the age of twenty five, Bakshi directed some episodes of these shows as well as “Sad Cat” and “James Hound”.   In 1965, he was assigned by CBS at age twenty-eight to produce a television superhero cartoon series.  At this time, Bakshi was then named creative director of Terrytoons.  He confirmed his contempt of this title by the creation the “Mighty Heroes,” which were some of the most absurd, slightly striking superheroes ever:  Tornado Man, Cuckooman, Ropeman, Strongman and Diaper Baby.  Unbelievably, CBS prized the idea, and the transitory but spirited series was conceived (www.imdb.com/name/nm0000835/bio).
In 1967, when Terrytoons dissolved, Bakshi was promoted to Producer and Director of Paramount Cartoon Studios, also called Famous Studios.   At this time, he completed four projects:   “Super Basher and Bop,” “Marvin Digs,” “Mini Squirts” and “The Fiendish Five” (www.imdb.com/name/nm0000835/bio).  Unexpectedly, the cartoon marketplace studio shut down and Bakshi was acquired by Steve Krantz Productions to control direction and production of “Rocket Robin hood” at Al Guest Studios in Toronto.  At this time, Bakshi also produced and directed “Spiderman”.  Spidey was then presented to screens for the first time (www.ralphbakshi.com).
By 1968, Bakshi launched a studio of his own named Ralph’s Spot.  There, he operated alongside Peter Max on a variety of projects and completed commercials spots for the companies such as Fanta and Encyclopedia Britannica.  Still allied with Krantz, Bakshi produced his initial theatrical animated piece, which was a raw, almost X-rated adaptation of Robert Crumb’s subversive comic strip “Fritz the Cat.”  Together they journeyed to Oakland for negotiations with Crumb to secure the rights.  Crumb was delighted to connect with them in the endeavor.  Just about halfway through the construction of Fritz the Cat, the whole studio was transported to Los Angeles because the Cartoonists Union declined to collaborate with the studio. Rather than suspend their efforts, Bakshi and Krantz also relocated to California where the Los Angeles Union was pleased to receive the project.  “Fritz the Cat” was then produced entirely in 2D animation.  The audio tracks were recorded virtually in full on the streets of New York, with the exclusion of Fritz and a small number of supplementary characters.  “Fritz the Cat” opened in April of 1972 receiving enthusiastic reviews.  While Crumb despised the completed creation, Fritz was confirmed to be a frontrunner on the late-night movie marketplace.  The Museum of Modern Art even screened the film.  A sequel to Fritz was planned, however Bakshi, who had a falling out with Krantz, declined to be involved (www.ralphbakshi.com).
Bakshi’s subsequent intense feature, “Heavy Traffic,” was more extreme than “Fritz the Cat.”  The live action shots were filmed for “Heavy Traffic” and then integrated with the animation.  In 1973, the film was screened at the Museum of Modern Art where it stunned and confounded its viewers (www.ralphbakshi.com).  Countless cartoon enthusiasts regard this revolutionary, scattered account of a juvenile artist daydreaming in New York as Bakshi’s most superb effort.
His next feature was entitled “Coonskin,” which depicted an assault on Hollywood racial typecasts.  It was so ruthless that the movie was protested and as a result, debates over Bakshi as a racist ensued.  The production of “Coonskin” initiated in 1973 at the recently opened Bakshi Studios in Hollywood.  Yet again, live action footage was utilized in this project and coupled in conjunction with the animation.  “Coonskin” opened a few years later in 1975 which premiered at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.  The debate over racism caused so many hullabaloos that Paramount quickly retreated from its release.  Thankfully, Bryanston Pictures promptly supported the movie and released it in theatres even though with the persistent debate (www.imdb.com/name/nm0000835/bio).
Written, directed and produced by Bakshi, the film “Wizards” was released in 1977 and acknowledged with immense approval.  Rotoscope (traced live-action footage, then subsequently animated drawings) was not used in “Wizards,” however, Bakshi managed to include original Nazi war footage (www.ralphbakshi.com).  Although not immediately successful, “Wizards’” popularity improved through the years and the sci-fi fantasy tale, which paralleled the Holocaust, is presently a common fan favorite today.
An animated version of J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” commenced directly after “Wizards.”  A two-part version of the famous tale, which is also said to be parallel for World War II, was designed.  Bakshi filmed the whole movie in live action first and then utilized the rotoscoping method to animate the infamous story.  The film was released in 1978; however, it was unfortunately a disappointment to the critics.  The second part of the sequel, which was in mid-production, was cut short and was never accomplished (www.spock.com/Ralph-Bakshi).
“Hey, Good Looking” was released in 1980, which was also entirely written, directed, and produced by Bakshi.  This film was completely animated with live action footage applied for certain elements such as backgrounds.  “Hey, Good Looking”, a wistful glimpse of 1950’s street gangs, was originally finished in 1975; however, it was shelved from release by Warner Brothers until 1980.  Bakshi directed “American Pop” in 1982, which was his own personal praise to rock music.  Somehow Bakshi’s common rotoscope recipe hindered the film’s success and earned it lukewarm reviews.  In 1983, amidst mixed reviews, the release of “Fire and Ice”, Bakshi disappeared from the film and animation scene for just about a decade (www.ralphbakshi.com).
During this time period, Bakshi relocated back to New York and continued his artistic journey now as a painter full-time (www.ralphbakshi.com).  He occasionally interrupted his work to aid in the productions such as the “Harlem Shuffle” video for the Rolling Stones in 1985 (www.xs4all.nl/~hwalther/ralphbakshi).  Bakshi also found time to contribute for a short film for PBS (Public Broadcasting Service) entitled “This Ain’t Be Bop,” in 1987, starring Harvey Keitel.  “This Ain’t Be Bop” was a glance at the standards of the beat generation (www.animazing.com/gallery/pages/bio_bakshi).
However, Bakshi soon appeared in Los Angeles to focus on the animated series “The New Adventures of Mighty Mouse” which broadcasted throughout 1987 and 1988.  For this endeavor, Bakshi appointed John Kricfalusi (who later earned his fame when he created the infamous “Ren and Stimpy”).  However, the Mighty Mouse series stirred up controversy when the religious rightwing media accused the series of drug use promotion.  For instance, in one episode, Mighty Mouse was revitalized by smelling a white flower.  What eventually eradicated Mighty Mouse, though, was not the media but the ratings.  CBS maintained that the show was popular in adult audiences; however, it was a dud with the children’s audiences, for whom the series targeted (www.ralphbakshi.com).
After that unfortunate incident, in 1991, Bakshi directed a live action and animation big-screen feature called “Cool World” which was released by Paramount.  The cast included Brad Pitt, Kim Basinger and Gabriel Byrne.  In 1994, his subsequent work was the live action movie “The Cool and the Crazy”, featuring Alicia Silvertsone and Jared Leto, which was written and directed by Bakshi was aired exclusively on the Showtime network.  Bakshi wrote, directed and produced two animations for Hannah Barbera in 1995: “Babe He Calls Me” and “Malcolm and Melvin.”  He also created a sci-fi detective series meant for HBO dubbed “Spicy City” in 1996 (www.ralphbakshi.com).
Ralph Bakshi’s work initiated discussion and controversy in all his projects while he incessantly breached new ground in his art form.  Throughout his career as an artist, he encouraged the audience to view cartoons in a new influential manner through his imaginative environments.  Without question, Bakshi pioneered animation film’s future with mature premise by means of political interpretation and irony.  For this reason, the Museum of Modern Art has supplemented his animations to their collected works for conservation (www.animazing.com/gallery/pages/bio_bakshi).

Work Cited

http://www.animationarchive.org/bio/2005/12/bakshi-ralph.html
http://www.animazing.com/gallery/pages/bio_bakshi
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000835/bio
http://www.ralphbakshi.com
http://www.spock.com/Ralph-Bakshi
http://www.tv.com/ralph-bakshi/person
http://www.xs4all.nl/~hwalther/ralphbakshi

Posted by: 82ojos | April 15, 2009

Crime In The City

This is a lil’ slideshow I put together using photoshop and flickr.  It’s a step-by-step visual editorial on the mainstream perspective and stereotype that grafitti is nothing but crime and not art.Crime In The City Click on the picture to view the slideshow on flickr. Creative Commons License
Crime In The City by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

Posted by: 82ojos | April 1, 2009

Interior Space

Here is my Octopi series.  It is part of a collaborative class installation.  I chose different octopi in interior spaces, usually enganging in normal activities and errands.  An octopi’s presence on land, just floating through the air, immediately makes the viewer think twice about the contrast in environment, and furthermore, the space and movement surrounding the character.

gettin' his economic recession on

gettin' his economic recession on


Creative Commons License
Gettin’ The Economic Recession On by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

dark, daunting and a lil' drunk

dark, daunting and a lil' drunk

Creative Commons License
Dark Daunting And A Lil’ Drunk by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

waitin' for some fresh ink

waitin' for some fresh ink

Creative Commons License
Waitin’ For Some Fresh Ink by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

the best part of wakin' up

the best part of wakin' up

Creative Commons License
The Best Part Of Wakin’ Up by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

runnin' thangz

runnin' thangz

Creative Commons License
Runnin’ Thangz by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

gettin' his cholesterol on... a true American

gettin' his cholesterol on... a true American

Creative Commons License
A True American by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

drinkin' like a fish

drinkin' like a fish

Creative Commons License
Drinkin’ Like A Fish by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

experimentin' and chemistratin'

experimentin' and chemistratin'

Creative Commons License
Experimentin’ And Chemistratin’ by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

shoppin' for necessities

shoppin' for necessities

Creative Commons License
Shoppin’ For Necessities by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

missin' his train

missin' his train

Creative Commons License
Missin’ His Train by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

rockin' out with his tentacle out

rockin' out with his tentacle out

Creative Commons License
Roctopi by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

eight rounds at a time

eight rounds at a time

Creative Commons License
Eight Rounds At A Time by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

field trip

field trip

Creative Commons License
Field Trip by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

takin' notes on the land-dweller's festive movements

takin' notes on the land-dweller's festive movements

Creative Commons License
Phantom Of America’s Best Dance Crew by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

they got me locked up... won't let me out

they got me locked up... won't let me out

Creative Commons License
Convicted Octopi by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

exlorin' and tresspassin'

explorin' and tresspassin'

Creative Commons License
Explorin’ And Tresspassin’ by Seth Arends is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

Posted by: 82ojos | March 10, 2009

I Am A Cliche

onlythebody30

This is my example of cruddy cliche use in an ad.  Sex appeal is played-out and perhaps one of the easiest and lazy ways to market a product.  The woman doesn’t even have a face showing, only ideal, yet unrealistic, curves are flaunted.  As for the text, is it sarcastic?  Or is it just that absurd that it seems like sarcasm?  Is it me, or don’t respectable women want guys to be attracted to their mind, soul and body?  I hope not very many women would feel this way as much as I hope this ad didn’t actually prove successful.

Posted by: 82ojos | March 10, 2009

I Am A Metaphor

ca36-128-metaphor1

This is my example of well thought use of metaphors for an ad.  It is for a homeless mission in Miami.  I especially like it because of the use of multiple metaphors all pertaining to a single lifestyle and struggle.

Posted by: 82ojos | March 2, 2009

Chapter 2 Reading

A phrase like digital technology is a term our ancestors will, in most cases, will not understand in their lifetime.  Presently, though, digital technology floods our civilization and the conveniences this technology consistently provides makes it difficult to live or even imagine life without technology.  Even though some people still do not utilize contemporary technologies by choice in their work, digital technology still serves a function in their daily lives.  As civilization persists to discover and adapt to technology, it is expected that innovative forms of media and artistic expression would advance. Surely, there is a notable distinction between digital technology as a tool and using this technology as a medium for artistic expression.  Such technology has thrived and grown for decades and has instigated the industrial revolution to quickly develop, ushering in a new age of technological revolution. The technology accessible to ordinary individuals is considerably remarkable.  Many of us would find life less enjoyable without our recently developed toys like the cellular telephone, personal computer, MP3 players or navigation systems.  In spite of this, technology as a means for information is a separate issue compared to the use of technology as a means artistic expression.
Chapter 2 discusses the ways technology has produced new opportunities for artists to take technology as a tool and transform it into an artistic medium.  This chapter conversed about art installations using technology today with screens, lighting, virtual reality, space and scientific technology, projection and music.  A noticeable key adjustment is tools typically used as mediums, can be used collectively as a whole in order to produce an attractive and fascinating display, performance, and/or interaction with the audience.  The way digital technology can interact with and develop a relationship with its audience is truly special in terms of personal intimacy.  Ordinary everyday objects such as lighting can be used like in “Vectorial Elevation (Relational Architecture #4)” by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, where he directed a group of searchlights with robotics to create gorgeous display of illumination reaching up to the heavens.  A further interesting example from the book was the use of barcodes.  In “Bar Code Hotel”, Perry Hoberman used bar code scans, transmitted by computer and projected on the walls around a room.  The use of music is also growing, “Telesymphony” by Golan Levin, where the audience were seated in an auditorium with indexed seats, cellular phones and ring tones.  Musicians then coordinated a layered symphony of various phone rings from the audience.  This, once again, is a good example of a new method using a tool as a medium.
Finding and differentiating digital technology, as a tool versus a medium seems to be defining the difference between technology and art.  In digital art, the technology itself is an unconditional requirement in order to produce the art, however the technology is never a genuine work of art, it is the ideas that transform the technology into expression.  While technology and ideas are required to produce the actual work of art, neither of the two exhibits the intensions or expression without the other.  An artist’s perceptions and thoughts applied and united with the range of digital tools and resources offered, permit the work to be produced and come to fruition.

Posted by: 82ojos | February 24, 2009

Spiritual Sedative

pope_j2

Creative Commons License
Spiritual Sedative is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

For this project we discussed the use of a poster to address a belief we feel conviction for.  We discussed using subersive, against the norm ideas and messages.  This poster is influenced by Karl Marx who once stated that religion is the opium for the masses in the Communist Manifesto. Now, I don’t want people to get the wrong impression, I am certainly not a communist nor a marxist, merely interested in those perspectives because I find they do have some good ideas.  Also, I believe religion and spirituality is usually a beneficial and healthy practice in one’s daily life.  However, too much of one thing is almost always a bad thing, and if one innodates themselves with religion and church constantly, the weight of that influence can be too heavy.  Another danger is an organized religion’s power to manipulate, assimilate and control such enormous groups of people to believe, act, think and speak in a particular way.  It is probably due to my ability to thrive on and embrace individualism.  I suppose it is difficult for me to imagine such restraint, judgment and lack of freedom in my life…

Posted by: 82ojos | February 13, 2009

Successful Ads

You're So Smart

You're So Smart

A successful advertisement should be attention grabbing, first of all.  If it doesn’t grab your eye for more than a few seconds, it has failed.  The imagery is important, a picture is worth a thousand words.  The intent should be clear, not necessarily obvious, but comprehendible.  There is a psychology to color, if you utilize color appropriately, you can manipulate the customer more easily.  Perhaps most importantly use most, if not all of, the principles and elements of design.

In this nearly ridiculous vintage Parliament cigarette ad, the imagery is what catches your attention.  The man and woman appear to be living the good life with their styling party apparel, it makes us want to live that good life.  They are both wearing expressions of pleasure.  The woman is even wearing some sort of cigarette crown.  The use of color is a key factor in why this ad is successful.  The imagery, and main focus, is bordered or framed to separate and create emphasis on the couple.  The use of complimentary colors (blue and yellow), creates harmony, contrast and spatial depth in the picture.  The white border achieves this as well.  The overall mood in the ad is class, the slightly muted yet strong colors (dark blue, golden yellow) match that.  Even the white is an eggshell white.  The font in which the text is written is a mature, almost flamboyant font, also reinforcing that classy mood.  Balance is achieved with the placement of the image on top and the text below, and there is a lot of justification given on why you would so smart to smoke a cigarette with only half the filter.  Placing the image above leads the eye to the text below, which without the picture, would not have grabbed your attention.  Strangely enough it is perhaps the background that actually keeps the eye more than the foreground.  I’m unsure exactly what those little blue spheres are in the background, but I think its caviar.  This again reminds us of an idealistic life, if you like eating fish eggs.  The spheres are in an eye-pleasing pattern.  This helps the ad more than a simple party scene in the background.  It isolates the characters, again putting the emphasis on them.  The sphere pattern contributes a great deal of texture, rhythm and movement to the ad.  The background is interesting enough to keep the eyes moving around, but not distract you from the intent.  The repetition of the spherical shapes also brings attention to the other less uniform shapes, the couple and of course the cigarettes.

Posted by: 82ojos | February 10, 2009

Assignment #2 – Chapter 1 reading

In the first chapter of Digital Art by Christiane Paul, a concise summary of digital art and new media’s role in today’s world is presented.  Paul converses about digital art’s young age in the art world, as well as its social effect and origins.  Digital art is such a recent and exciting progression in art culture to know that many various types of artists are utilizing their computers to improve and perfect their art.  The manner in which technology is used as a medium permits the artist to use numerous, fairly untried approaches and explore forms which artists have been unable to engage until recently.  An artist may just use technologies for small perfecting touches to their work, still, a level of polishing, which was previously unavailable.  Whatever the way in which these technologies are used, a successful result will still always require creativity.

The effect of technology on Western culture began to bud around the early 1950’s.  Some of the earliest most primitive computers like the UNIVAC or the ENIAC, filled an entire room and all it did was record data and make calculations.  Advancements were further accelerated and crafted due to the space race and the cold war with Russia.  Since then, we’ve engineered laptops able to run circles around the UNIVAC.  Presently, people from around the globe use the internet to serve them as a platform to connect and communicate like never before.  Our culture is surrounded by technology, almost all the time, almost everywhere.  We’ve become very dependent upon the computer.  Business is flourishing at an increasing rate on the internet, opening a wider door for global markets and international trade.  The world wide web has bonded with society and become a vital component in the world’s economy.  A key factor in this phenomenon is simple convenience.  New means to offer customer’s new conveniences, has business evolving in sync with the internet.  The phrase ‘time is money’ is as true as ever before.  Corporations have always loved to save time and money and it’s apparent that computers do as well, making the two a match made in heaven.

In fields such as print, communication design and photography, digital imaging has changed and impacted the profession profoundly.  Established methods of graphic design have transformed and unwanted elements like ruby lithe and t-squares can be made nearly invisible.  An intriguing idea, which Paul discussed was creating images digitally and then producing it using conventional techniques.  These types of combinations and possibilities have now taken commercial imagery to new forms due to this.  Computers have enabled us to manipulate images using multiple tools controlling aspects such as transparency, contrast, saturation, blending and overlapping.  Improvements in graphic design technology even assist the justice department when identifying suspects through visual traits.

As well as the societal and commerce potential, western culture has been influenced by digital art as a means for individuals to express themselves.  Technology is fusing art with math and science.  The relationship between the two is yielding genuinely distinct work as well as provoking new thoughts in art and probably effecting art forever.

Older Posts »

Categories